Some limitations carbon dating elucidating the mashup hype definition challenges

Dating is a technique used in archeology to ascertain the age of artifacts, fossils and other items considered to be valuable by archeologists.

There are many methods employed by these scientists, interested in the old, to get to know the age of items.

The practical applications of the study of tree rings are numerous.

Dendrochronology is an interdisciplinary science, and its theory and techniques can be applied to many applications. These research interests have in common the following objectives: Ring-counting does not ensure the accurate dating of each individual ring.

This is a method that does not find the age in years but is an effective technique to compare the ages of two or more artifacts, rocks or even sites.

It implies that relative dating cannot say conclusively about the true age of an artifact.

For example, a geologist may examine a cutting where the rocks appear as shown in Figure 1.

Here he can see that some curved sedimentary rocks have been cut vertically by a sheet of volcanic rock called a dyke.

The field relationships, as they are called, are of primary importance and all radiometric dates are evaluated against them.

It is clear that the sedimentary rock was deposited and folded before the dyke was squeezed into place.

By looking at other outcrops in the area, our geologist is able to draw a geological map which records how the rocks are related to each other in the field.

From the mapped field relationships, it is a simple matter to work out a geological cross-section and the relative timing of the geologic events.

His geological cross-section may look something like Figure 2.

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